How Will You Measure Success? (Part 2) The Metrics You Need

In Part 1, I discussed the importance of measuring your project’s success, and walked through the Success Mapping meeting where you work with all you players to do it. The goal in this is to gather data so that you can document the impact of all your hard work and demonstrate your success. To do that, you need metrics.

So how do you define metrics?

Start at the Beginning

In your Success Mapping meeting, define the three key metrics that will determine success for each Department/Success Owner. Simply make a list in this format:

Department A

  • Key Metric #1
    • How this metric is measured
    • When this metric is measured
    • Where this metric’s measured data is stored
    • Who this data is shared with, how it’s shared, and when it’s shared
    • Who gathers the baseline data for this metric before the initiative starts
  • Key Metric #2
    • How this metric is measured
    • When this metric is measured
    • Where this metric’s measured data is stored
    • Who this data is shared with, how it’s shared, when it’s shared
    • Who gathers the baseline data for this metric before the initiative starts
  • Key Metric #3
    • How this metric is measured
    • When this metric is measured
    • Where this metric’s measured data is stored
    • Who this data is shared with, how it’s shared, when it’s shared
    • Who gathers the baseline data for this metric before the initiative starts

Then repeat this list for Department B, Department C, and all other departments involved. There may be some overlap or duplication across departments, but that’s okay—seeing the same particular data for the same time period for two different departments may help you spot differences in how each is proceeding so you can apply what the leading department is doing to another that’s lagging.

Get Buy-In

A list isn’t enough for your participants, though. If they’ve never worked on such an initiative, they’ll be unfamiliar the process and the needed materials, so take the time for some discussion:

  • Explain why metrics are important
  • Ask your participants for examples of ways they track and measure success in their department
  • Explain how, in this context, not achieving a target isn’t failure—the data provides insight on what’s not working and opportunity to improve
  • Provide examples of success metrics other organizations have used

The more you can get the departments to see data as a tool they can use rather than just extra work to pile on their day, the more likely they will be to buy-in to the initiative and support it. Which not only increases your chances for success, but also your ability to demonstrate and prove it when you’re done.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: